The Noble Eightfold Path – AS A WAY OF LIFE

The most fundamental and important aspect of human existence is not one’s beliefs, nor social status, nor intellect, nor material possessions; rather it is motives, emotions, feelings. Almost by definition it is feelings, and feelings alone, which give purpose, meaning, value and significance to our every action and encounter. Without feeling or motives there would be no incentive for one to think, speak or act; life would be chronic apathy. Yet some feelings are more rewarding, wholesome and meaningful than others. And quite often feelings (be they mental or physical) are unpleasant, empty, sorrowful, disharmonious, worrisome, irritating, frustrating or in some way of negative value; in other words, dukkha.  Continue reading “The Noble Eightfold Path – AS A WAY OF LIFE”

Meditation for Beginners

Meditation for Beginners: 20 Practical Tips for Quieting the Mind

Meditation is the art of focusing 100% of your attention in one area. The practice comes with a myriad of well-publicized health benefits including increased concentration, decreased anxiety, and a general feeling of happiness.

Although a great number of people try meditation at some point in their lives, a small percentage actually stick with it for the long-term. This is unfortunate, and a possible reason is that many beginners do not begin with a mindset needed to make the practice sustainable.
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How To Find Inner Peace

The path to inner peace is not simple or short. You cannot just wake up one day and decide you are going to have inner peace from that point forward. It is a process, a journey that needs to be appreciated every step of the way. You need to be willing to let go and accept your full spectrum of emotions. You need to be ready to step outside the box you have allowed yourself to be put into and start from scratch, getting to know yourself all over again and be willing to make mistakes. And most importantly, you have to realize that only you have control over your emotional responses and reactions and they can be changed for the better.

No one article or even one book is going to give you the answers to achieving inner peace. What they can do is assist you in initiating change within yourself by bringing light to something you were not previously aware of. Once you become aware of ways you can improve how you live your life, you can begin true transformations. These transformations are paradigm shifts or evolutions of the mind, spirit and soul. Once you really change your ways to be in alignment with your true self, you will never go back, just like a tadpole to a frog or a caterpillar to a butterfly. Continue reading “How To Find Inner Peace”

The Goal – To Become The Greatest Person in the World

Buddhism teaches that being the greatest is an absolute achievement free of comparison. What does that mean? It means that to be the greatest is not an achievement that can be attained through competition. You can’t win greatness – but you can achieve it. That means everyone can be the greatest.

Here’s an example: For a healthy ant to successfully carry one grain of rice is a great achievement. For a healthy horse to successfully carry one grain of rice is not all that terrific. The ant has put his best effort into his job. It has fulfilled its purpose as an ant. When this truth is achieved, the ant is no longer just an ant. The ant has moved into the realm of Truth – it has become the greatest ant in the world.
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The Role of Wealth in Buddhism

Although Buddhism has been characterized as an ascetic religion, asceticism was in fact experimented with and rejected by the Buddha before he attained enlightenment. As far as Buddhism is concerned, the meaning of the word ‘asceticism’ is ambiguous and should not be used without qualification.

The term ‘poverty’ is also misleading. The familiar Buddhist concepts are rather contentment (santutthi) or limited desires (appicchata). Poverty (dadiddiya) is in no place praised or encouraged in Buddhism. As the Buddha said, “For householders in this world, poverty is suffering” [A.III.350]; “Woeful in the world is poverty and debt.”
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Stories from Buddhism: Compassion

On a very chilly winter day, a destitute man came to see a monk at a temple. He was shivering because of hunger and cold.

The man said to the monk, “You can tell that I feel hungry and cold. My whole family is sick and in deadly danger. If you have anything to help us maintain our lives even for only one day, please help us with your compassion and mercy.”

The monk felt compassionate for him, but he couldn’t find anything to give to the man. When he looked up, he saw the Buddha statue in the temple that he worshiped. He removed the gold ring on the back of the Buddha statue and gave it to the man, saying, “Take it and exchange it for some money.” Continue reading “Stories from Buddhism: Compassion”

Eight lessons of the Buddha for a happy and harmonious life

1. Start small – this is normal. A jug fills slowly, drop by drop. Each artist was once an amateur. We all start out small, do not neglect small. If you are consistent and patient, you will succeed! No one can succeed in just one night: Success comes to those who are willing to start small and work hard until you fill the jug.

2. Thoughts are material. Our consciousness – that is all. You become what you think. If a man speaks or acts with evil thoughts, he pursues the pain. If a man speaks or acts with pure intentions, followed by happiness, which, like a shadow, will never leave. In order to live properly, you need to fill in the brain  right thoughts. Right thinking will give everything you want, wrong thinking – an evil which in the end will destroy you. All the offenses arise from the mind. If the mind is changed, there would remain misdemeanors?
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