Understanding Yin Yang the theory

Understanding Yin and yang I – The Theory

When we hear the phrase ‘Yin and Yang’ many of us may first think of the Yin Yang symbol so ubiquitous on key chains or a symbol which represents Chinese/ Tibetan culture. The theory of Yin and Yang is much more profound than an image carved on key chains. This ever-present symbol is called the Taijitu. It’s the universal symbol for the theory of Yin and Yang and of Taoism.

Ancient Chinese people were greatly interested in the relationships and patterns that occurred in nature. Instead of studying isolated things, they viewed the world as a harmonious and holistic entity. In their eyes, no single being or form could exist unless it was seen in relation to its surrounding environment. Yin Yang is perhaps the most known and documented concept used within Taoism. Continue reading “Understanding Yin and yang I – The Theory”

True Love and Life – Buddhist Principles

Love, without desire to possess, knowing well that in the ultimate sense there is no possession and no possessor: this is the highest love.

Love, without speaking and thinking of “I,” knowing well that this so-called “I” is a mere delusion.

Love, without selecting and excluding, knowing well that to do so means to create love’s own contrasts: dislike, aversion and hatred.

Love, embracing all beings: small and great, far and near, be it on earth, in the water or in the air.

Love, embracing impartially all sentient beings, and not only those who are useful, pleasing or amusing to us. Continue reading “True Love and Life – Buddhist Principles”

Buddhism – Seeds of Social Transformation

The application of the Buddha’s teachings in the social realm is spawning a social revolution among the Dalit communities of India. Buddhism represents not only an alternative to oppressive caste hierarchy, but is also providing practical ways to inner change so that they become empowered socially as well as spiritually. Continue reading “Buddhism – Seeds of Social Transformation”